Accountability for What You Say is Dangerous and That’s Okay

[Note: I offered Maaret Pyhäjärvi the right to review this post and suggest edits to it before I published it. She declined.]

A few days ago I was keynoting at the New Testing Conference, in New York City, and I used a slide that has offended some people on Twitter. This blog post is intended to explore that and hopefully improve the chances that if you think I’m a bad guy, you are thinking that for the right reasons and not making a mistake. It’s never fun for me to be a part of something that brings pain to other people. I believe my actions were correct, yet still I am sorry that I caused Maaret hurt, and I will try to think of ways to confer better in the future.

Here’s the theme of this post: Getting up in front of the world to speak your mind is a dangerous process. You will be misunderstood, and that will feel icky. Whether or not you think of yourself as a leader, speaking at a conference IS an act of leadership, and leadership carries certain responsibilities.

I long ago learned to let go of the outcome when I speak in public. I throw the ideas out there, and I do that as an American Aging Overweight Left-Handed Atheist Married Father-And-Father-Figure Rough-Mannered Bearded Male Combative Aggressive Assertive High School Dropout Self-Confident Freedom-Loving Sometimes-Unpleasant-To-People-On-Twitter Intellectual. I know that my ideas will not be considered in a neutral context, but rather in the context of how people feel about all that. I accept that.  But, I have been popular and successful as a speaker in the testing world, so maybe, despite all the difficulties, enough of my message and intent gets through, overall.

What I can’t let go of is my responsibility to my audience and the community at large to speak the truth and to do so in a compassionate and reasonable way. Regardless of what anyone else does with our words, I believe we speakers need to think about how our actions help or harm others. I think a lot about this.

Let me clarify. I’m not saying it’s wrong to upset people or to have disagreement. We have several different culture wars (my reviewers said “do you have to say wars?”) going on in the software development and testing worlds right now, and they must continue or be resolved organically in the marketplace of ideas. What I’m saying is that anyone who speaks out publicly must try to be cognizant of what words do and accept the right of others to react.

Although I’m surprised and certainly annoyed by the dark interpretations some people are making of what I did, the burden of such feelings is what I took on when I first put myself forward as a public scold about testing and software engineering, a quarter century ago. My annoyance about being darkly interpreted is not your problem. Your problem, assuming you are reading this and are interested in the state of the testing craft, is to feel what you feel and think what you think, then react as best fits your conscience. Then I listen and try to debug the situation, including helping you debug yourself while I debug myself. This process drives the evolution of our communities. Jay Philips, Ash Coleman, Mike Talks, Ilari Henrik Aegerter, Keith Klain, Anna Royzman, Anne-Marie Charrett, David Greenlees, Aaron Hodder, Michael Bolton, and my own wife all approached me with reactions that helped me write this post. Some others approached me with reactions that weren’t as helpful, and that’s okay, too.

Leadership and The Right of Responding to Leaders

In my code of conduct, I don’t get to say “I’m not a leader.” I can say no one works for me and no one has elected me, but there is more to leadership than that. People with strong voices and ideas gain a certain amount of influence simply by virtue of being interesting. I made myself interesting, and some people want to hear what I have to say. But that comes with an implied condition that I behave reasonably. The community, over time negotiates what “reasonable” means. I am both a participant and a subject of those negotiations. I recommend that we hold each other accountable for our public, professional words. I accept accountability for mine. I insist that this is true for everyone else. Please join me in that insistence.

People who speak at conferences are tacitly asserting that they are thought leaders– that they deserve to influence the community. If that influence comes with a rule that “you can’t talk about me without my permission” it would have a chilling effect on progress. You can keep to yourself, of course; but if you exercise your power of speech in a public forum you cannot cry foul when someone responds to you. Please join me in my affirmation that we all have the right of response when a speaker takes the microphone to keynote at a conference.

Some people have pointed out that it’s not okay to talk back to performers in a comedy show or Broadway play. Okay. So is that what a conference is to you? I guess I believe that conferences should not be for show. Conferences are places for conferring. However, I can accept that some parts of a conference might be run like infomercials or circus acts. There could be a place for that.

The Slide

Here is the slide I used the other day:

maaret

Before I explain this slide, try to think what it might mean. What might its purposes be? That’s going to be difficult, without more information about the conference and the talks that happened there. Here are some things I imagine may be going through your mind:

  • There is someone whose name is Maaret who James thinks he’s different from.
  • He doesn’t trust nice people. Nice people are false. Is Maaret nice and therefore he doesn’t trust her, or does Maaret trust nice people and therefore James worries that she’s putting herself at risk?
  • Is James saying that niceness is always false? That’s seems wrong. I have been nice to people whom I genuinely adore.
  • Is he saying that it is sometimes false? I have smiled and shook hands with people I don’t respect, so, yes, niceness can be false. But not necessarily. Why didn’t he put qualifying language there?
  • He likes debate and he thinks that Maaret doesn’t? Maybe she just doesn’t like bad debate. Did she actually say she doesn’t like debate?
  • What if I don’t like debate, does that mean I’m not part of this community?
  • He thinks excellence requires attention and energy and she doesn’t?
  • Why is James picking on Maaret?

Look, if all I saw was this slide, I might be upset, too. So, whatever your impression is, I will explain the slide.

Like I said I was speaking at a conference in NYC. Also keynoting was Maaret Pyhäjärvi. We were both speaking about the testing role. I have some strong disagreements with Maaret about the social situation of testers. But as I watched her talk, I was a little surprised at how I agreed with the text and basic concepts of most of Maaret’s actual slides, and a lot of what she said. (I was surprised because Maaret and I have a history. We have clashed in person and on Twitter.) I was a bit worried that some of what I was going to say would seem like a rehash of what she just did, and I didn’t want to seem like I was papering over the serious differences between us. That’s why I decided to add a contrast slide to make sure our differences weren’t lost in the noise. This means a slide that highlights differences, instead of points of connection. There were already too many points of connection.

The slide was designed specifically:

  • for people to see who were in a specific room at a specific time.
  • for people who had just seen a talk by Maaret which established the basis of the contrast I was making.
  • about differences between two people who are both in the spotlight of public discourse.
  • to express views related to technical culture, not general social culture.
  • to highlight the difference between two talks for people who were about to see the second talk that might seem similar to the first talk.
  • for a situation where both I and Maaret were present in the room during the only time that this slide would ever be seen (unless someone tweeted it to people who would certainly not understand the context).
  • as talking points to accompany my live explanation (which is on video and I assume will be public, someday).
  • for a situation where I had invited anyone in the audience, including Maaret, to ask me questions or make challenges.

These people had just seen Maaret’s talk and were about to see mine. In the room, I explained the slide and took questions about it. Maaret herself spoke up about it, for which I publicly thanked her for doing so. It wasn’t something I was posting with no explanation or context. Nor was it part of the normal slides of my keynote.

Now I will address some specific issues that came up on Twitter:

1. On Naming Maaret

Maaret has expressed the belief that no one should name another person in their talk without getting their permission first. I vigorously oppose that notion. It’s completely contrary to the workings of a healthy society. If that principle is acceptable, then you must agree that there should be no free press. Instead, I would say if you stand up and speak in the guise of an expert, then you must be personally accountable for what you say. You are fair game to be named and critiqued. And the weird thing is that Maaret herself, regardless of what she claims to believe, behaves according to my principle of freedom to call people out. She, herself, tweeted my slide and talked about me on Twitter without my permission. Of course, I think that is perfectly acceptable behavior, so I’m not complaining. But it does seem to illustrate that community discourse is more complicated than “be nice” or “never cause someone else trouble with your speech” or “don’t talk about people publicly unless they gave you permission.”

2. On Being Nice

Maaret had a slide in her talk about how we can be kind to each other even though we disagree. I remember her saying the word “nice” but she may have said “kind” and I translated that into “nice” because I believed that’s what she meant. I react to that because, as a person who believes in the importance of integrity and debate over getting along for the sake of appearances, I observe that exhortations to “be nice” or even to “be kind” are often used when people want to quash disturbing ideas and quash the people who offer them. “Be nice” is often code for “stop arguing.” If I stop arguing, much of my voice goes away. I’m not okay with that. No one who believes there is trouble in the world should be okay with that. Each of us gets to have a voice.

I make protests about things that matter to me, you make protests about things that matter to you.

I think we need a way of working together that encourages debate while fostering compassion for each other. I use the word compassion because I want to get away from ritualized command phrases like “be nice.” Compassion is a feeling that you cultivate, rather than a behavior that you conform to or simulate. Compassion is an antithesis of “Rules of Order” and other lists of commandments about courtesy. Compassion is real. Throughout my entire body of work you will find that I promote real craftsmanship over just following instructions. My concern about “niceness” is the same kind of thing.

Look at what I wrote: I said “I don’t trust nice people.” That’s a statement about my feelings and it is generally true, all things being equal. I said “I’m not nice.” Yet, I often behave in pleasant ways, so what did I mean? I meant I seek to behave authentically and compassionately, which looks like “nice” or “kind”, rather than to imagine what behavior would trick people into thinking I am “nice” when indeed I don’t like them. I’m saying people over process, folks.

I was actually not claiming that Maaret is untrustworthy because she is nice, and my words don’t say that. Rather, I was complaining about the implications of following Maaret’s dictum. I was offering an alternative: be authentic and compassionate, then “niceness” and acts of kindness will follow organically. Yes, I do have a worry that Maaret might say something nice to me and I’ll have to wonder “what does that mean? is she serious or just pretending?” Since I don’t want people to worry about whether I am being real, I just tell them “I’m not nice.” If I behave nicely it’s either because I feel genuine good will toward you or because I’m falling down on my responsibility to be honest with you. That second thing happens, but it’s a lapse. (I do try to stay out of rooms with people I don’t respect so that I am not forced to give them opinions they aren’t willing or able to process.)

I now see that my sentence “I want to be authentic and compassionate” could be seen as an independent statement connected to “how I differ from Maaret,” implying that I, unlike her, am authentic and compassionate. That was an errant construction and does not express my intent. The orange text on that line indicated my proposed policy, in the hope that I could persuade her to see it my way. It was not an attack on her. I apologize for that confusion.

3. Debate vs. Dialogue

Maaret had earlier said she doesn’t want debate, but rather dialogue. I have heard this from other Agilists and I find it disturbing. I believe this is code for “I want the freedom to push my ideas on other people without the burden of explaining or defending those ideas.” That’s appropriate for a brainstorming session, but at some point, the brainstorming is done and the judging begins. I believe debate is absolutely required for a healthy professional community. I’m guided in this by dialectical philosophy, the history of scientific progress, the history of civil rights (in fact, all of politics), and the modern adversarial justice system. Look around you. The world is full of heartfelt disagreement. Let’s deal with it. I helped create the culture of small invitational peer conferences in our industry which foster debate. We need those more than ever.

But if you don’t want to deal with it, that’s okay. All that means is that you accept that there is a wall between your friends and those other people whom you refuse to debate with. I will accept the walls if necessary but I would rather resolve the walls. That’s why I open myself and my ideas for debate in public forums.

Debate is not a process of sticking figurative needles into other people. Debate is the exchange of views with the goal of resolving our differences while being accountable for our words and actions. Debate is a learning process. I have occasionally heard from people I think are doing harm to the craft that they believe I debate for the purposes of hurting people instead of trying to find resolution. This is deeply insulting to me, and to anyone who takes his vocation seriously. What’s more, considering that these same people express the view that it’s important to be “nice,” it’s not even nice. Thus, they reveal themselves to be unable to follow their own values. I worry that “Dialogue not debate” is a slogan for just another power group trying to suppress its rivals. Beware the Niceness Gang.

I understand that debating with colleagues may not be fun. But I’m not doing it for fun. I’m doing it because it is my responsibility to build a respectable craft. All testing professionals share this responsibility. Debate serves another purpose, too, managing the boundaries between rival value systems. Through debate we may discover that we occupy completely different paradigms; schools of thought. Debate can’t bridge gaps between entirely different world views, and yet I have a right to my world view just as you have a right to yours.

Jay Philips said on Twitter:

I admire Jay. I called her and we had a satisfying conversation. I filled her in on the context and she advised me to write this post.

One thing that came up is something very important about debate: the status of ideas is not the only thing that gets modified when you debate someone; what also happens is an evolution of feelings.

Yes I think “I’m right.” I acted according to principles I think are eternal and essential to intellectual progress in society. I’m happy with those principles. But I also have compassion for the feelings of others, and those feelings may hold sway even though I may be technically right. For instance, Maaret tweeted my slide without my permission. That is copyright violation. She’s objectively “wrong” to have done that. But that is irrelevant.

[Note: Maaret points out that this is legal under the fair use doctrine. Of course, that is correct. I forgot about fair use. Of course, that doesn’t change the fact that though I may feel annoyed by her selective publishing of my work, that is irrelevant, because I support her option to do that. I don’t think it was wise or helpful for her to do that, but I wouldn’t seek to bar her from doing so. I believe in freedom to communicate, and I would like her to believe in that freedom, too]

I accept that she felt strongly about doing that, so I [would] choose to waive my rights. I feel that people who tweet my slides, in general, are doing a service for the community. So while I appreciate copyright law, I usually feel okay about my stuff getting tweeted.

I hope that Jay got the sense that I care about her feelings. If Maaret were willing to engage with me she would find that I care about her feelings, too. This does not mean she gets whatever she wants, but it’s a factor that influences my behavior. I did offer her the chance to help me edit this post, but again, she refused.

4. Focus and Energy

Maaret said that eliminating the testing role is a good thing. I worry it will lead to the collapse of craftsmanship. She has a slide that says “from tester to team member” which is a sentiment she has expressed on Twitter that led me to say that I no longer consider her a tester. She confirmed to me that I hurt her feelings by saying that, and indeed I felt bad saying it, except that it is an extremely relevant point. What does it mean to be a tester? This is important to debate. Maaret has confirmed publicly (when I asked a question about this during her talk) that she didn’t mean to denigrate testing by dismissing the value of a testing role on projects. But I don’t agree that we can have it both ways. The testing role, I believe, is a necessary prerequisite for maintaining a healthy testing craft. My key concern is the dilution of focus and energy that would otherwise go to improving the testing craft. This is lost when the role is lost.

This is not an attack on Maaret’s morality. I am worried she is promoting too much generalism for the good of the craft, and she is worried I am promoting too much specialism. This is a matter of professional judgment and perspective. It cannot be settled, I think, but it must be aired.

The Slide Should Not Have Been Tweeted But It’s Okay That It Was

I don’t know what Maaret was trying to accomplish by tweeting my slide out of context. Suffice it to say what is right there on my slide: I believe in authenticity and compassion. If she was acting out of authenticity and compassion then more power to her. But the slide cannot be understood in isolation. People who don’t know me, or who have any axe to grind about what I do, are going to cry “what a cruel man!” My friends contacted me to find out more information.

I want you to know that the slide was one part of a bigger picture that depicts my principled objection to several matters involving another thought leader. That bigger picture is: two talks, one room, all people present for it, a lot of oratory by me explaining the slide, as well as back and forth discussion with the audience. Yes, there were people in the room who didn’t like hearing what I had to say, but “don’t offend anyone, ever” is not a rule I can live by, and neither can you. After all, I’m offended by most of the talks I attend.

Although the slide should not have been tweeted, I accept that it was, and that doing so was within the bounds of acceptable behavior. As I announced at the beginning of my talk, I don’t need anyone to make a safe space for me. Just follow your conscience.

What About My Conscience?

  • My conscience is clean. I acted out of true conviction to discuss important matters. I used a style familiar to anyone who has ever seen a public debate, or read an opinion piece in the New York Times. I didn’t set out to hurt Maaret’s feelings and I don’t want her feelings to be hurt. I want her to engage in the debate about the future of the craft and be accountable for her ideas. I don’t agree that I was presuming too much in doing so.
  • Maaret tells me that my slide was “stupid and hurtful.” I believe she and I do not share certain fundamental values about conferring. I will no longer be conferring with her, until and unless those differences are resolved.
  • Compassion is important to me. I will continue to examine whether I am feeling and showing the compassion for my fellow humans that they are due. These conversations and debates I have with colleagues help me do that.
  • I agree that making a safe space for students is important. But industry consultants and pundits should be able to cope with the full spectrum, authentic, principled reactions by their peers. Leaders are held to a higher standard, and must be ready and willing to defend their ideas in public forums.
  • The reaction on Twitter gave me good information about a possible trend toward fragility in the Twitter-facing part of the testing world. There seems to be a significant group of people who prize complete safety over the value that comes from confrontation. In the next conference I help arrange, I will set more explicit ground rules, rather than assuming people share something close to my own sense of what is reasonable to do and expect.
  • I will also start thinking, for each slide in my presentation: “What if this gets tweeted out of context?”

(Oh, and to those who compared me to Donald Trump… Can you even imagine him writing a post like this in response to criticism? BELIEVE ME, he wouldn’t.)

The New Testing Conference

Anna Royzman is starting a new testing conference which she has decided to call the New Testing Conference. Anna has asked me to tell you about some of the ways we will be trying to live up to that bold name.

(Disclosure: although it doesn’t belong to me and I am not in charge of anything, bear in mind that I have an economic interest in it. I’m being paid to present at it and I’m advising Anna on the design of the program and invitation of speakers. I will be doing a tutorial and probably other things, too.)

Position Talks as Gentle Debate

We were talking about what it means to have a test conference that focuses on “newness” and one of the things we realized is that new is always controversial. New is always sketchy. For any new practice, there will be lots of practitioners who roll their eyes about it or scowl darkly. Therefore, if we want to talk about new things, we have to deal with the clash between “tried and comfortable” and “new and nervous.” So, this conference must help good ideas move beyond the new and nervous stage, while letting the not so good ideas fall back into obscurity (at least for a while… until the next generation unearths it again like a cursed monkey paw).

A structure we want to try is this:

  1. Hold two or more short position talks around a particular topic. For instance “Is BDD worth doing or a vain waste of time?”
  2. The speakers discuss and debate the topic BEFORE the conference. That way, at the conference, they would be able to put their best ideas forward and avoid misrepresenting the other side’s argument.
  3. They each speak for 10-15 minutes explaining their arguments.
  4. There is a 20-minute break for the audience, during which they may speak with the speakers to give them ideas or continue the debate. The speaker don’t get a break.
  5. The speakers give 5-minute follow-up lightning talks to respond to the other speakers or amend their previous statements.

Each Track Talk Includes a Demonstration, Exercise, or Experience Report

We feel that just talking about concepts isn’t enough. So, each track talk will include at least one of the following:

  • Demonstration: Show how an idea works in practice, then take questions and comments from the audience.
  • Exercise: Get the audience to try something, then debrief.
  • Experience Report: Tell a specific story about something that you experienced at a particular time and place, then take questions and comments.

“360 degree” Tutorials

I’m not sure if that’s quite the right name, but we want to do some workshops based on a particular structure I’ve been experimenting with:

  1. The instructor offers a challenge (which he has previously performed and has results ready to share).
  2. The students perform the challenge.
  3. Debrief with instructor commentary and critique.
  4. The instructor shows what he did and challenges the students to critique it.
  5. Students critique instructors work.
  6. Instructor critiques his own work.

Part of the fun of a “360” kind of workshop, as an instructor, is that I try to anticipate every criticism that the students will make of my work. I usually miss something, but then I add it to my list of critiques and I am even more prepared for the next time I run the workshop. I end up looking smarter and smarter– but of course the punchline is: I’m smarter because I opened myself to all this criticism. And when we all get comfortable hearing critical reactions to our work, our whole community grows smarter, faster.

We. Use. Tools.

Context-Driven testers use tools to help ourselves test better. But, there is no such thing as test automation.

Want details? Here’s the 10,000 word explanation that Michael Bolton and I have been working on for months.

Editor’s Note: I have just posted version 1.03 of this article. This is the third revision we have made due to typos. Isn’t it interesting how hard it is to find typos in your own work before you ship an article? We used automation to help us with spelling, of course, but most of the typos are down to properly spelled words that are in the wrong context. Spelling tools can’t help us with that. Also, Word spell-checker still thinks there are dozens of misspelled words in our article, because of all the proper nouns, terms of art, and neologisms. Of course there are the grammar checking tools, too, right? Yeah… not really. The false positive rate is very high with those tools. I just did a sweep through every grammar problem the tool reported. Out of the five it thinks it found, only one, a missing hyphen, is plausibly a problem. The rest are essentially matters of writing style.

One of the lines it complained about is this: “The more people who use a tool, the more free support will be available…” The grammar checker thinks we should not say “more free” but rather “freer.” This may be correct, in general, but we are using parallelism, a rhetorical style that we feel outweighs the general rule about comparatives. Only humans can make these judgments, because the rules of grammar are sometimes fluid.

Re-Inventing Testing: What is Integration Testing? (Part 1)

(Thank you, Anne-Marie Charrett, for reviewing my work and helping with this post.)

One of the reasons I obsessively coach other testers is that they help me test my own expertise. Here is a particularly nice case of that, while working with a particularly bright and resilient student, Anita Gujrathi, (whose full name I am using here with her permission).

The topic was integration testing. I chose it from a list of skills Anita made for herself. It stood out because integration testing is one of those labels that everyone uses, yet few can define. Part of what I do with testers is help them become aware of things that they might think they know, yet may have only a vague intuition about. Once we identify those things, we can study and deepen that knowledge together.

Here is the start of our conversation (with minor edits for grammar and punctuation, and commentary in brackets):

James:
What do you mean by integration testing?
[As I ask her this question I am simultaneously asking myself the same question. This is part of a process known as transpection. Also, I am not looking for “one right answer” but rather am exploring and exercising her thought processes, which is called the Socratic Method.]

Anita:
Integration test is the test conducted when we are integrating two or more systems.
[This is not a wrong answer, but it is shallow, so I will press for more details.

By shallow, I mean that leaves out a lot of detail and nuances. A shallow answer may be fine in a lot of situations, but in coaching it is a black box that I must open.]

James:
What do you mean by integrated?

Anita:
That means kind of joining two systems such that they give and take data.
[This is a good answer but again it is shallow. She said “kind of” which I take as a signal that she may be not quite sure what words to use. I am wondering if she understands the technical aspects of how components are joined together during integration. For instance, when two systems share an operating space, they may have conflicting dependencies which may be discovered only in certain situations. I want to push for a more detailed answer in order to see what she knows about that sort of thing.]

James:
What does it mean to join two systems?
[This process is called “driving to detail” or “drilling down”. I just keep asking for more depth in the answer by picking key ideas and asking what they mean. Sometimes I do this by asking for an example.]

Anita:
For example, there is an application called WorldMate which processes the itineraries of the travellers and generates an XML file, and there is another application which creates the trip in its own format to track the travellers using that XML.
[Students will frequently give me an example when they don’t know how to explain a concept. They are usually hoping I will “get it” and thus release them from having to explain anything more. Examples are helpful, of course, but I’m not going to let her off the hook. I want to know how well she understands the concept of joining systems.

The interesting thing about this example is that it illustrates a weak form of integration– so weak that if she doesn’t understand the concept of integration well enough, I might be able to convince her that no integration is illustrated here.

What makes her example a case of weak integration is that the only point of contact between the two programs is a file that uses a standardized format. No other dependencies or mode of interaction is mentioned. This is exactly what designers do when they want to minimize interaction between components and eliminate risks due to integration.]

James:
I still don’t know what it means to join two systems.
[This is because an example is not an explanation, and can never be an explanation. If someone asks what a flower is and you hold up a rose, they still know nothing about what a flower is, because you could hold up a rose in response to a hundred other such questions: what is a plant? what is a living thing? what is botany? what is a cell? what is red? what is carbon? what is a proton? what is your favorite thing? what is advertising? what is danger? Each time the rose is an answer to some specific aspect of the question, but not all aspects, but how do you know what the example of a rose actually refers to? Without an explanation, you are just guessing.]

Anita:
I am coming to that. So, here we are joining WorldMate (which is third-party application) to my product so that when a traveller books a ticket from a service and receives the itinerary confirmation email, it then goes to WorldMate which generates XML to give it to my product. Thus, we have joined or created the communication between WorldMate and my application.
[It’s nice that Anita asserts herself, here. She sounds confident.

What she refers to is indeed communication, although not a very interesting form of communication in the context of integration risk. It’s not the sort of communication that necessarily requires integration testing, because the whole point of using XML structures is to cleanly separate two systems so that you don’t have to do anything special or difficult to integrate them.]

James:
I still don’t see the answer to my question. I could just as easily say the two systems are not joined. But rather independent. What does join really mean?
[I am pretending not to see the answer in order to pressure her for more clarity. I won’t use this tactic as a coach unless I feel that the student is reasonably confident.]

Anita:
Okay, basically when I say join I mean that we are creating the communication between the two systems
[This is the beginning of a good answer, but her example shows only a weak sort of communication.]

James:
I don’t see any communication here. One creates an XML, the other reads it. Neither knows about the other.
[It was wrong of me to say I don’t see any communication. I should have said it was simplistic communication. What I was trying to do is provoke her to argue with me, but I regret saying it so strongly.]

Anita:
It is a one-way communication.
[I agree it is one-way. That’s part of why I say it is a weak form of integration.]

James:
Is Google integrated with Bing?
[One major tactic of the Socratic method is to find examples that seem to fit the student’s idea and yet refute what they were trying to prove. I am trying to test what Anita thinks is the difference between two things that are integrated and two things that are simply “nearby.”]

Anita:
Ah no?

James:
According to you, they are! Because I can Google something, then I can take the output and feed it to Bing, and Bing will do a search on that. I can Google for a business name and then paste the name into Bing and learn about the business. The example you gave is just an example of two independent programs that happen to deal with the same file.

Anita:
Okay.

James:
So, if I test the two independent programs, haven’t I done all the testing that needs to be done? How is integration testing anything more or different or special?

At this point, Anita seems confused. This would be a good time to switch into lecture mode and help her get clarity. Or I could send her away to research the matter. But what I realized in that moment is that I was not satisfied with my own ideas about integration. When I asked myself “what would I say if I were her?” my answers sounded not much deeper than hers. I decided I needed to do some offline thinking about integration testing.

Lots of things in out world are slightly integrated. Some things are very integrated. This seems intuitively obvious, but what exactly is that difference? I’ve thought it through and I have answers now. Before I blog about it, what do you think?

How Not to Standardize Testing (ISO 29119)

Many years ago I took a management class. One of the exercises we did was on achieving consensus. My group did not reach an agreement because I wouldn’t lower my standards. I wanted to discuss the matter further, but the other guys grew tired of arguing with me and declared “consensus” over my objections. This befuddled me, at first. The whole point of the exercise was to reach a common decision, and we had failed, by definition, to do that– so why declare consensus at all? It’s like getting checkmated in chess and then declaring that, well, you still won the part of the game that you cared about… the part before the checkmate.

Later I realized this is not so bizarre. What they had effectively done is ostracize me from the team. They had changed the players in the game. The remaining team did come to consensus. In the years since, I have found that changing the boundaries or membership of a community is indeed an important pillar of consensus building. I have used this tactic many times to avoid unhelpful debate. It is one reason why I say that I’m a member of the Context-Driven School of Testing. My school does not represent all schools, and the other schools do not represent mine. Therefore, we don’t need consensus with them.

Then what about ISO 29119?

The ISO organization claims to have a new standard for software testing. But ISO 29119 is not a standard for testing. It cannot be a standard for testing.

A standard for testing would have to reflect the values and practices of the world community of testers. Yet, the concerns of the Context-Driven School of thought, which has been in development for at least 15 years have been ignored and our values shredded by this so-called standard and the process used to create it. They have done this by excluding us. There are two organizations explicitly devoted to Context-Driven values (AST and ISST) and our community holds several major conferences a year. Members of our community speak at all the major practitioners conferences, and our ideas are widely cited. Some of the most famous testers in the the world, including me, are Context-Driven testers. We exist, and together with the Agilists, we are the source of nearly every new idea in testing in the last decade.

The reason they have excluded us is that they know we won’t agree to any simplistic standard based on templates or simple formulae. We know those things look pretty but they don’t help. If ISO doesn’t exclude us, they worry they will never finish. They know we will challenge their evidence, and even their ethics and basic competence. This is why I say the craft is not ready for standards. It will be years before all the recognized experts in testing can come together and agree on anything substantial.

The people running the ISO effort know exactly who we are. I personally have had multiple public debates with Stuart Reid, on stage. He cannot pretend we don’t exist. He cannot pretend we are some sort of lunatic fringe. Tens of thousands of testers have watched my video lectures or bought my books. This is not a case where ISO can simply declare us to be outsiders.

The Burden of Proof

The Context-Driven community stands for excellence in testing. This is why we must reject this depraved attempt by ISO to grab power and assert control over our craft. Our craft is still an open marketplace of ideas, and it is full of strong debates. We must protect that marketplace and allow it to evolve. I want the fair chance to put my competitors out of business (or get them to change their business) with the high quality of my work. Context-Driven testing has been growing in strength and numbers over the years. Whereas this ISO effort appears to be a job protection program for people who can’t stomach debate. They can’t win the debate so they want to remake the rules.

The burden of proof is not on me or any of us to show that the standard is wrong, nor is it our job to make it right. The burden is on those who claim that the craft can be standardized to study the craft and recognize and resolve the deep differences among us. Failing that, there can be no ethical or rational basis for standardization.

This blog post puts me on record as opposing the ISO 29119 standard. Together with my colleagues, we constitute a determined and sustained and principled opposition.

Let’s test at Let’s Test

I’ve been telling people that the best conference I know for thinking testers is Let’s Test (followed closely by CAST, which I will also be at, this year, in New York). Let’s Test was created by people who experienced CAST and wanted to be even more dedicated to Context-Driven testing principles.

Now, I’m here in Stockholm once again to be with the most interesting testers in Europe. I’m not done with my presentations, yet. But I still have a couple of days.

(I will presenting a new model of what it means to be an excellent observer, together with one or two observation challenges for participants. And Pradeep Soundararajan and I will be presenting a tutorial on reviewing a specification by testing it.)

Let’s Test is not for the faint of heart. Events go on day and night. I suffer from terrible jet lag, so I probably won’t be seen after dinner. But for you crazy kids, it’s a great place to try a testing exercise, or present one.

(Note: I’m being paid to teach at Let’s Test. I don’t get a percentage of the gate, though– I get paid the same whether anyone shows up or not.)

Australia Let’s Test

I will also be in Australia for the first Let’s Test happening down there, in September. There are some interesting testers in Oz. I’m sure they will all be there. It will be the first great party of ambitious intellectual testers that I know of in the history of Australian testing.

Anne-Marie Charrett and I will be doing our Coaching Testers tutorial, which is the only time this year we will teach it together.

“Intellectual” testers?

Why do I keep saying that? Because the state of the practice in testing is for testers NOT to read about their craft, NOT to study social science or know anything about the proper use of statistics or the meaning of the word “heuristic”, and NOT to challenge the now 40 year stale ideas about making testing into factory work that lead directly to mass outsourcing of testing to lowest bidder instead of the most able tester.

Intellectual testers are not the most common type of tester.

The ISTQB and similar programs require your stupidity and your fear in order to survive. And their business model is working. They don’t debate us for the same reason that HP made billions of dollars selling bad test tools by pitching them to non-testers who had more money than wisdom. Debating us would spoil their racket.

So, don’t be like that. Be smart.

I’ll see you at Let’s Test.

Justifying Real Acceptance Testing

This post is not about the sort of testing people talk about when nearing a release and deciding whether it’s done. I have another word for that. I call it “testing,” or sometimes final testing or release testing. Many projects perform that testing in such a perfunctory way that it is better described as checking, according to the distinction between testing and checking I have previously written of on this blog. As Michael Bolton points out, that checking may better be described as rejection checking since a “fail” supposedly establishes a basis for saying the product is not done, whereas no amount of “passes” can show that it is done.

Acceptance testing can be defined in various ways. This post is about what I consider real acceptance testing, which I define as testing by a potential acceptor (a customer), performed for the purpose of informing a decision to accept (to purchase or rely upon) a product.

Do we need acceptance testing?

Whenever a business decides to purchase and rely upon a component or service, there is a danger that the product will fail and the business will suffer. One approach to dealing with that problem is to adopt the herd solution: follow the thickest part of the swarm; choose a popular product that is advertised or reputed to do what you want it to do and you will probably be okay. I have done that with smartphones, ruggedized laptops, file-sharing services, etc. with good results, though sometimes I am disappointed.

My business is small. I am nimble compared to almost every other company in the world. My acceptance testing usually takes the form of getting a trial subscription to service, or downloading the “basic” version of a product. Then I do some work with it and see how I feel. In this way I learned to love Dropbox, despite its troubling security situation (I can’t lock up my Dropbox files), or the fact that there is a significant chance it will corrupt very large files. (I no longer trust it with anything over half of a gig).

But what if I were advising a large company about whether to adopt a service or product that it will rely upon across dozens or hundreds or thousands of employees? What if the product has been customized or custom built specifically for them? That’s when acceptance testing becomes important.

Doesn’t the Service Level Agreement guarantee that the product will work?

There are a couple of problems with relying on vendor promises. First, the vendor probably isn’t promising total satisfaction. The service “levels” in the contract are probably narrowly and specifically drawn. That means if you don’t think of everything that matters and put that in the contract, it’s not covered. Testing is a process that helps reveal the dimensions of the service that matter.

Second, there’s an issue with timing. By the time you discover a problem with the vendor’s product, you may be already relying on it. You may already have deployed it widely. It may be too late to back out or switch to a different solution. Perhaps your company negotiated remedies in that case, but there are practical limitations to any remedy. If your vendor is very small, they may not be able to afford to fix their product quickly. If you vendor is very large, they may be able to afford to drag their feet on the fixes.

Acceptance testing protects you and makes the vendor take quality more seriously.

Acceptance testing should never be handled by the vendor. I was once hired by a vendor to do penetration testing on their product in order to appease a customer. But the vendor had no incentive to help me succeed in my assignment, nor to faithfully report the vulnerabilities I discovered. It would have been far better if the customer had hired me.

Only the accepting party has the incentive to test well. Acceptance testing should not be pre-agreed or pre-planned in any detail– otherwise the vendor will be sure that the product passes those specific tests. It should be unpredictable, so that the vendor has an incentive to make the product truly meet its requirements in a general sense. It should be adaptive (exploratory) so that any weakness you find can be examined and exploited.

The vendor wants your money. If your company is large enough, and the vendor is hungry, they will move mountains to make the product work well if they know you are paying attention. Acceptance testing, done creatively by skilled testers on a mission, keeps the vendor on its toes.

By explicitly testing in advance of your decision to accept the product, you have a fighting chance to avoid the disaster of discovering too late that the product is a lemon.

My management doesn’t think acceptance testing matters. What do I do?

1. Make the argument, above.
2. Communicate with management, formally, about this. (In writing, so that there is a record.)
It is up to management to make decisions about business risk. They may feel the risk is not worth worrying about. In that case, you must wait and watch. People are usually more persuaded by vivid experiences, rather than abstract principles, so:
1. Collect specific examples of the problems you are talking about. What bugs have you experienced in vendor products?
2. Collect news reports about bugs in products of your vendors (or other vendors) that have been disruptive.
3. In the event you get to do even a little acceptance testing, make a record of the problems you find and be ready to remind management of that history.

 

To The New Tester

About once a week, I get an email like one of these:

Hi James,

I’m from Hyderabad, India. I’m working as a Testing Engineer and doing Manual Testing from the Last 1 Year. I want to know what are things I need to follow to become a good tester. I didn’t have any programming background. I want to learn automation testing for career growth, I want to improve my test case preparing skills and documentation skills. Please suggest me in this regard.

Hi, James,

I am looking for software testing jobs. Actually I’m fresher, I don’t know much about testing but I interested too. Can you please suggest me which type of testing is good?(like manual or automation or etc..) I have got some ideas about manual testing and DB-PL/SQL.

Respected Sir,

I am a Big Fan Of You.

BTech Graduate In Electrical & Electronics. Done Software testing course in QTP and Selenium. I got job as Mobile Application Tester. I am the only tester in this company. iOS and Android Apps. Now i have 3 months experience. I am mainly doing Manual testing. I dont know , whether i am going in right path.

Can you help me please? (Advice)

This blog post shall be my standard answer to these emails…

Dear New Tester/Testing Hopeful,

Thank you for choosing testing. We need smart people in our craft, and I hope you are one of them. I know you must have something going for you because, unlike most young testers, you reached out to me. That’s not easy.

Here are some general ideas:

  • Read my blog (www.satisfice.com/blog).
  • Read the materials on my website (www.satisfice.com).
  • Consider reading either of of my books: Lessons Learned in Software Testing, or Secrets of a Buccaneer-Scholar.
  • Read the materials and blog at www.developsense.com
  • Get on Twitter and watch the conversations among the Context-Driven community. Participate in those discussions.
  • Join software-testing@yahoogroups.com. It’s a quiet, moderated email forum for Context-Driven testers.
  • I offer free coaching, too, but you have to read this blog post first.
  • Practice testing things that aren’t secret, and then post your test results online so that others can see them.
  • Consider taking the RTI Online class.
  • Consider taking the BBST class.
  • Participate in sessions conducted by www.weekendtesting.com.
  • Consider attending the Let’s Test conference or the CAST conference.
  • If you want to get good at using tools while testing, try learning Python. Personally, I use Perl, but I hear Python is good.

Here are some books to read:

  • Introduction to General Systems Thinking, by Gerald M. Weinberg
  • Quality Software Management, Vol. 1: Systems Thinking, by Gerald M. Weinberg
  • Tacit and Explicit Knowledge, by Harry Collins
  • The Black Swan, by Nassim Taleb
  • Testing Computer Software, by Cem Kaner, remains a good classic testing book.

What about certification?

  • Don’t get certified. There are no respectable commercial testing certifications.
  • If you are forced to get certified for some reason, do not take it seriously. It’s not an achievement, it’s just a conveyor belt that extracts your money and gives you nothing you couldn’t get for the price of a Google search.
  • True certification remains this: the respect of respectable people.

What kinds of testers are there?

  • Automated? Manual? There is no such thing as manual or automated testing. It’s all just testing. Testing is often supported by tools that attempt to simulate user interaction with the system. This is what people call “test automation” even though it is only automating a crude approximation of one aspect of testing. If you have the ambition to be a one-man test team, it is extremely valuable to learn how to make your own tools.
  • Exploratory? Scripted? There is no such thing as an exploratory or scripted tester. All good testing is exploratory to some degree and scripted to some degree.
  • Tester. This is a testing generalist who can contribute to any test team. Sometimes called a QA analyst, QA engineer, or test engineer. I prefer the simplicity of “tester.”
  • Omega Tester. The omega tester (which I sometimes call a test jumper, after the analogy of a paratrooper) is one who can do anything. An omega tester is equipped to be the only tester in a project team, if necessary. Omega testers can lead testing, or work with a team of other testers. I am an omega tester. I aspire to be a good one.
  • Performance Tester. The performance tester understands the mathematics and dynamics of the performance of large-scale systems. They use tools that create high loads and measure the performance envelope of systems as they scale up. Performance testers often don’t think of themselves as testers.
  • Usability Tester. The usability tester is a bit mythical. I have met only two dedicated usability testers in my entire career, but I have seen more of them from a distance. A usability tester specializes in studying how users feel about using and learning a product.
  • Security Tester. Security testers also often don’t think of themselves as testers. Security is an exciting, specialized form of testing that requires the mastery of a great many facts about a great many technologies.
  • Testing Toolsmith. A testing toolsmith is a programmer dedicated to writing and maintaining tools that help testers. This is what a lot of people would call an “automated tester” but you better not use that term around me.
  • “SDET” Software Development Engineer in Test. This means a full on programmer who does testing using his programming skills.

I want to help everyone, but at the same time, I have my own work to do. So, I limit my attention to a special kind of student. I work with people who study and practice and want to test better and understand testing more deeply than others. If that describes you, then instead of writing to me with a question, write to me with examples of your work.

Good luck!

— James

P.S. See also what Allen Johnson has to say about this.

 

A Public Service Announcement About Exploratory Testing

[Updated: I revamped and added some more examples to the list.]

I got this message from Oliver Vilson, today:

Oliver V.: hi James. Just had a chat with Helena_JM. She reminded me something… don’t know if you’ve written blog about it or pushed it into  RST.. One Test lead from another company mentioned me he has problems with his testers. Some of them are saying that they don’t have to do test plans, since your teaching seems to align that…
James Bach: Any more details?
Oliver V.: rough translation from test team lead : “ET seems to have reputation as “excuse for shitty testing”. People can’t explain what they did and why. If you ask them for test plan or explanation, all you get is “but Bach said…”.

I have, from time to time, heard rumors that some people cite my writings and teachings as an excuse to do bad testing. I think it would help to do a public service announcement…

Attention Testers and Managers of Testers

If a tester claims he is justified in doing bad work because of something I’ve published or said, please email me at james@satisfice.com, or Skype me, and I will help you stop that silliness.

I teach skilled software testing for people who intend to do an excellent job. That process is necessarily exploratory in nature. It also necessarily will have some scripted elements– partly due to the nature of thinking and partly due to the requirements of excellent intellectual work.

I do not teach evasiveness or obscurantism. I do not ever tell a tester that he can get away with refusing to explain his test process. Explaining testing is an important part of being a professional.

Why People Get Confused

I reinvented software testing for myself, from first principles. So, I teach from a very different set of premises. This is necessary, because common ideas about testing are so idiotic. But it does result in confusion when my ideas are taken out of context and “mixed in” to the idiocy. Consider: “I won’t create a detailed test plan document” is a perfectly ordinary and potentially reasonable thing to say in RST. It is a statement about things made explicit in a document, not a statement about lack of planning. Yet Factory School methodology confuses documents for content. If you say that to one of them, it may be mistaken for a refusal to apply appropriate rigor to your work.

Here are some examples of how someone might misapply my teachings:

  1. Rapid Software Testing methodology (RST) is not the same thing as exploratory testing. ET is very simple. Anyone can do ET, just as anyone can look at a painting. But there’s a huge difference between a skilled appraisal of a painting by an expert and a bored glance by a schoolkid. RST is a methodology for doing testing (including scripted and exploratory testing) well. Therefore, anyone doing ET badly is not doing my methodology.
  2. In RST, a plan is not a document, it’s a set of ideas. Therefore, I say you don’t need to have a test plan template, or any sort of written test plan document in order to have a good test plan. I often document my test ideas, though, in different ways, when that helps. Therefore, the lack of a test plan (a guiding set of ideas) probably represents an immature and possibly inadequate test process, but the lack of a test plan document is not necessarily a problem.
  3. In RST, a test is not a document, it’s a performance. Therefore the lack of documented tests is not necessarily a problem, but poor testing (which can be determined by direct observation by a skilled tester or test manager, just as poor carpentry or poor doctoring can be detected) is a problem.
  4. In RST, we have no templates for reporting. But reporting is crucial. Reporting skills are crucial. Accountability is crucial. Credibility is crucial. We teach the art of telling a testing story. Therefore, anyone who declines to explain himself when asked about his testing is not practicing RST. I disavow such testers. (However, just because explaining oneself is an important part of testing doesn’t mean a manager can insist on arbitrarily voluminous documentation or arbitrary metrics. I suspect that, in some cases, managers who complain about testers refusing to document or explain themselves are really just obsessed with a specific method of documentation and refusing to accept other viable solutions to the same problem.)
  5. In RST we say that testing cannot be automated, and that tools can become an obsession. This leads some to think I am against tools. No, I am against bad work. Unfortunately, some tools, such as expensive HP/Mercury tools, are often used to wastefully automate weak fact checking at he expense of good testing. Yes., tools and the technical skills to create and apply them play an important role in great testing. It’s not automating testing when I use tools, because testing is whatever testers do, not what tools do. Therefore a tester who refuses to learn and use tools in general is not practicing RST.
  6. In RST we distinguish between checking and testing. This allows us to distinguish between a test process that is appropriately thoughtful and deep, and one (based solely on checking) that would be reckless and shallow. But when we criticize a checking-only test strategy, some people get confused and think we are criticizing the presence of checking rather than the lack of testing. Therefore, a tester who refuses to design or perform checks that are actually economical and helpful is not doing RST.
  7. In RST, we ban unscientific, abusive attempts at using metrics to control the test process. But when some people hear us attack, say, the counting of test cases, they assume that means we don’t believe in even the concept or principle of measurement. Instead, we support using inquiry-focused metrics (which inspire questions rather than dictating decisions), we promote active skepticism about numbers applied to social systems, and we promote the development of observation, reasoning, and social skills that limit the need for quantification. Therefore any tester who simply refuses to consider using metrics of any kind is not doing RST.
  8. Some people hear about the freedom of exploratory testing, and they confuse that with irresponsibility. But that’s silly. If you drive a car, you are free to run over pedestrians or smash into buildings– except you don’t, because you are responsible! Also, it’s against the law. Freedom is not the same thing as having a right. Therefore, anyone who accepts the freedom of exploratory testing and cannot or will not manage that testing appropriately is an incompetent or irresponsible tester.

Benjamin Mitchell and the Trap of False Hypocrisy

One of the puzzles of intellectual life is how to criticize something you admire without sounding like you don’t admire it. Benjamin Mitchell has given an insightful talk about social dynamics in Agile projects. You should see it. I enjoyed it, but I also felt pricked by several missed opportunities where he could have done an even deeper analysis. This post is about one example of that.

Benjamin offers an example of feedback he got about feedback he gave to a member of his team:

“Your feedback to the team member was poor because:
it did not focus on any positive actions, and
it didn’t use any examples”

Benjamin immediately noticed that this statement appears to violate itself. Obviously, it doesn’t focus on positive actions and it doesn’t use any examples. To Benjamin this demonstrates hypocrisy and a sort of incompetence and he got his reviewer (who uttered the statement) to agree with him about that. “It’s incompetent in the sense that it has a theory of effectiveness that it violates,” Benjamin says. From his tone, he clearly doesn’t see this as the product of anything sinister, but more as an indicator of how hard it is to deeply walk our talk. Let’s try harder not to be hypocrites, I think he’s saying.

Except this is not an example of hypocrisy.

In this case, the mistake lies with Benjamin, and then with the reviewer for not explaining and defending himself when challenged.

It’s worth dwelling on this because methodologists, especially serious professional ones like Benjamin and me, are partly in the business of listening to people who have trouble saying what they mean (a population that includes all of humanity), then helping them say it better. He and I need to be very very good at what social scientists call “verbal protocol analysis.” So, let’s learn from this incident.

In order to demonstrate my point, I’d like to see if you agree to two principles:

  1. Context Principle: Everything that we ever do, we do in some particular situation, and that context has a large impact on what, how, and why we do things. For instance, I’m writing this in the situation of a quiet afternoon on Orcas Island, purely by choice, and not because I’m paid or forced to write it by a shadowy client with a sinister agenda.
  2. Enoughness Principle: Anything we do that is good or bad could have been even better, or even worse. Although it makes sense to try to do good work, that comes at a cost, and therefore in practice we stop at whatever we consider to be “good enough” and not necessarily the best we can do.

Assuming you accept those principles, see what happens when I slightly reword the offending comment:

In that situation, your feedback to the team member was poor compared to what you could easily have achieved because:
it did not focus on any positive actions, and
it didn’t use any examples”

Having added the words, what happens if Benjamin tells me that this statement doesn’t focus on positive actions and doesn’t cite an example? I reply like this:

“That’s a reasonable observation, but I think it’s out of place here. My advice pertains to giving feedback to people who feel frightened or threatened or may not have the requisite skills to comprehend the feedback or in a situation where I am not seen as a credible reviewer. And my advice pertains to situations where you want to invest in giving vivid, powerful advice– advice that teaches. However, in this case, I felt it was good enough (not perfect but good at a reasonable investment of my time) to ignore the positive (because, Benjamin, you already know you’re good, and you know that I know that you are good– so you don’t need me to give you a swig of brandy before telling you the “bad news”) and I thought that investing in careful phrasing of a vivid example might actually sound patronizing to you, because you already know what I’m talking about, man.”

In other words, with the added words in bold face, it becomes a little clearer that the situation of him advising his client, and us advising him, are different in important ways.

Imagine that Benjamin spots a misspelled word in my post. Does he need to give me an example of how to spell it? Does he need to speak about the potential benefits of good spelling? Does he need to praise my use of commas before broaching the subject of spelling? No. He just needs to point and say “that’s spelled wrong.” He can do that without being a hypocrite, don’t you think?

(Of course, if the situations are not different and the quality of the comment made to Benjamin is clearly not good enough, then it is fair to raise the issue that the feedback does not meet its own implied standard.)

Finally: I added those bolded words, but if I’m in a community that assumes them, I don’t need to add them. They are there whether I say them or not. We don’t need to make explicit that which is already a part of our culture. Perhaps the person who offered this feedback to Benjamin was assuming that he understood that advice is situational, and that a summary form of feedback is better in this case than a lengthy ritual of finding something to praise about Benjamin and then citing at least three examples.

…unless Benjamin is a frightened student… which he isn’t. Look at him in that video. He exudes self-confidence. That man is a responsible adult. He can take a punch.

Who’s the Real Monster?

“Best practice” thinking itself causes these misunderstandings. Many people seek to memorize protocols such as “how to give feedback… always do this… step 1: always say something nice step 2: always focus on solutions not problems… etc.” instead of understanding the underlying dynamics of communication and relationships. Then when they slip and accidentally behave in an insightful and effective way instead of following their silly scripts, their friends accuse them of being hypocrites.

When the explicit parts of our procedures are at war with the tacit parts, we chronically fall into such traps.

There is a silver lining here: it’s good to be a hypocrite if you are preaching the wrong things. Watch yourself. The next time you fail in your discipline to do X, seriously consider if your discipline is actually wrong, and your “failure” is actually success of some kind.

This is why when I talk about procedures, I speak of heuristics (which are fallible) and skills (which are plastic) and context (which varies). There are no best practices.

I’m going to wrap this up with some positive feedback, because he doesn’t know me very well, yet. Benjamin, I appreciate how, in your work, you question what you are told and reflect on your own thought processes in a spirit of both humility and confidence. YOU don’t seem infected by “best practice” folklore. Thank you for that.

 

 

What We Read

I staggered out of the Cambridge Press bookstore a bit dazed, today, having gorged on 21 books. [Addendum: I mean by this that I browsed them, purchased them, and had them shipped home.] If you want to know what a Context-Driven tester reads, here it is:

  • A First Course in Statistical Programming with R
  • Wisdom: Its Nature, Origins, and Development
  • Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory
  • Sequential Analysis and Observational Methods for the Behavioral Sciences
  • Observing Interaction: An Introduction to Sequential Analysis
  • Human Error
  • Combinatorics: A Problem Oriented Approach (Mathematical Association of America Textbooks)
  • A Mathematician Comes of Age (Spectrum)
  • The Golem at Large: What You Should Know about Technology (Canto)
  • The Golem: What You Should Know about Science (Canto)
  • A Practical Introduction to Denotational Semantics (Cambridge Computer Science Texts)
  • Dialogic Inquiry: Towards a Socio-cultural Practice and Theory of Education (Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives)
  • From Teams to Knots: Activity-Theoretical Studies of Collaboration and Learning at Work (Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives)
  • Nuts and bolts for the social sciences
  • How to Fold It: The Mathematics of Linkages, Origami and Polyhedra
  • The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning (Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology)
  • The Manuscript of Great Expectations: From the Townshend Collection, Wisbech (Cambridge Library Collection – Literary Studies)
  • The Cognitive Basis of Science
  • Satisficing and Maximizing: Moral Theorists on Practical Reason
  • The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition (Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology)
  • Risk Communication: A Handbook for Communicating Environmental, Safety, and Health Risks

One of the challenges I have for the ISTQB proponents is “What do you read?” You see it’s a trap. If they tell me they read widely, deeply and liberally, I contrast that with the intellectual desert that is the ISTQB Syllabus and ask them why there is such a disconnect between their education and their professional claims. And if they read narrowly, well, there you go.

If you want to be an excellent tester, you need a good education. You didn’t get that in school (or if you’re in school, you’re not getting it), so you need to do something like what I do: scout for fabulous and offbeat books about all the matters of great testing– and testing touches EVERYTHING!

[addendum: If you are not familiar with my distaste for institutional education, before picking a fight with me, go see my book, Secrets of a Buccaneer-Scholar. I spent 26 years doing the research by which I assert that school, although not always destructive and occasionally helpful, is certainly not necessary if you want to live a successful intellectual life. Each day of my life is another data point about how wrong were the teachers who told me I would not be successful without submitting to “the game” of school they desired me to play.]

Most of the books on my list are self-explanatory. One in particular may seem strange: the manuscript of Great Expectations. I picked that one up because the photographic images of Dickens’ original manuscript is a beautiful example of how messy the creative process is. Imagine trying to put metrics on the process of writing that, with all its crossouts and insertions.Writing is exploratory. Just. Like. Testing.

Context-Driven Testing at a Crossroads

Cem Kaner, who controls www.context-driven-testing.com, has announced an interesting change in his view of the Context-Driven School. He says he prefers to think of it in terms of the Context-Driven approach, not a school of thought. This is a significant change from his original view, which was that CDT is a different paradigm.

That means I’m the last of the founders of the Context-Driven School, as such, who remain true to the original vision. I will bear its torch along with any fellow travelers who wish to pursue a similar program.

Polarization? No. Paradigm!

One of the things that concerns Cem is the polarization of the craft. He doesn’t like it, anymore. I suppose he wants more listening to people who have different views about whether there are best practices or not. To me, that’s unwise. It empties the concept of much of its power. And frankly, it makes a mockery of what we have stood for. To me, that would be like a Newtonian physicist in the 1690’s wistfully wishing to “share ideas” with the Aristotelians. There’s no point. The Aristotelians were on a completely different path.

For me, Context-Driven thinking is delightfully about listening to people and talking to people about practices and dynamics of software testing. But this must happen within the humanist framework that we laid out in the seven principles of the Context-Driven school. That’s our world.

Polarization is beside the point. Polarization is a natural consequence of the fact that our world view is simply different. We are a different paradigm. Our paradigm cannot be explained or contained by any other testing paradigm, such as the Factory School, or the Analytical School. We must have the stomach to keep moving along with our program regardless of the huddled masses who Don’t Get It.

Why Is This Division Happening Now?

Cem’s change of position is happening partly because, after 16 years, he and I are no longer collaborators. Due to a simmering personal dispute (nothing to do with testing) that blew up last year, we no longer can stand to be in the same room with each other. Alas, I don’t think this will change. What that means, professionally, is that the conversations that we once had– the passionate arguments– which led to mutual accommodations and syntheses, no longer happen. This is too bad, because the Factory schoolers, who greatly outnumber us, will make good rhetoric out of any appearance of confusion between Cem and I about our visions of testing.

Meanwhile, I will say this about Cem: He’s a great man. His contributions to testing have been enormous. I disagree with him on some aspects of testing, but by and large he does great work. I’m sure if he weren’t so furious with me and I were able to talk to him without feeling an overpowering urge to kick holes in walls (I mean that literally), we would still be able to develop testing ideas together. However, I trust that whatever he does will be worth looking at. And I do have many other bright collaborators, so I’m going to be fine.

The Context-Driven School continues, because I, and those like me, are compelled to pursue excellence wherever it leads us, even if that means breaking with “conventional” software testing thinkers. I wish Cem luck as he consorts with those guys, but I fear his time will be, for the most part, wasted.

 

 

 

Why Scripted Testing is Not for Novices

…Unless you want bad testing.

Claire Moss writes:

I am surprised that you say that scripted testing is harder for novice
testers. I would have expected that having so much structure around
the tests would make getting into testing easier for someone with less
experience and that the scripted instructions would make up for a lack
of discipline on the part of the tester.

Structure != “being told what to do”
First, you are misusing the word “structure.” All testing is structured. If what you mean by structure is “externally imposed structure” then say that. But even if you are not aware of a structure in your testing, it is there. When I tell a novice tester to test, and don’t tell him how to test, he will be dominated by certain structures he is largely unaware of– or if aware he cannot verbalize or control them much. For instance: the user interface look and feel is a guiding structure for novice testers. They test what they see.

Cognitive science offer plenty of ideas and insights about the structures that guide our thinking and behavior. See the book Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely for more on this.

Scripted testing always has at least two distinct parts: test design and test execution. They must be considered independently.

Scripted test execution is quite a bit more difficult than exploratory testing, unless you are assuming that the tester following the script has exactly the same knowledge and skill as the test designer (even then it is a qualitatively different sort of cognitive process than designing). An exploratory tester is following (indeed forming as he goes) his own intentions and ideas. But, a scripted tester, to do well, must apprehend the intent of the one who wrote the script. Moreover, the scripted tester must go beyond the stated intent and honor the tacit intent, as well– otherwise it’s just shallow, bad testing.

Try using a script to guide a 10 year-old to drive a car safely on a busy city street. I don’t believe it can be done. You can’t overcome lack of basic skills with written instructions.

And sure, yeah, there is also the discipline issue, but that’s a minor thing, compared to the other things.

As for scripted test design, that also is a special skill. I can ask my son to put together a computer. He knows how to do that. But if I were to ask him for a comprehensive step-by-step set of instructions to allow me to do it, I doubt the result would help me much. Writing a script requires patience, judgment, and lots of empathy for the person who will execute it. He doesn’t yet have those qualities.

Most people don’t like to write. They aren’t motivated. Now give them a task that requires excellent writing. Bad work generally results.

Both on the design side and the execution side, scripted testing done adequately is harder than exploratory testing done adequately. It’s hard to separate an integrated cognitive activity into two pieces and still make it work.

The reason managers assume it’s simpler and easier is that they have low standards for the quality of testing and yet a strong desire for the appearances of order and productivity.

When I am training a new tester, I begin with highly exploratory testing. Eventually, I will introduce elements of scripting. All skilled testers must feel comfortable with scripted testing, for those rare times when it’s quite important.

Examples

1. Start browser

2. Go to CNN.com

3. Test CNN.com and report any problems you find.

This looks like a script, and it is sort of a script, but the interesting details of the testing are left unspecified. One of the elements of good test scripting is to match the instructions to the level of the tester as well as to the design goal of the test. In this case, no design goal is apparent.

This script does not necessarily represent bad testing– because it doesn’t represent any testing whatsoever.

1. Open Notepad

2. Type “hello”

3. Verify that “hello” appears on the screen.

This script has the opposite problem. It specifies what is completely unnecessary to specify. If the tester follows this script, he is probably dumbing himself down. There may be some real good reason for these steps, but again, the design goal is not apparent. The tester’s mind is therefore not being effectively engaged. Congratulations, designer, you’ve managed to treat a sophisticated miracle of human procreation, gestation, mothering, socializing, educating, etc. as if he were the equivalent of an animated poking stick. That’s like buying an iPad, then using it as a serving tray for a platter of cheese.

The Dual Nature of Context-Driven Testing

The Context-Driven School of software testing is a way of thinking about testing, AND a small but world-wide community of like-minded testers. There are other, larger, schools of testing thought. But CDT represents my paradigm of testing. By paradigm, I mean an organizing worldview, an ontology, a set of fundamental beliefs. When I say CDT is my paradigm, I mean that I believe all rational, educated people should want to understand testing in terms of the precepts of the Context-Driven School. This is like saying that I believe every rational, educated person should believe in microbes, atoms, genetics, and that the Sun does not revolve around the Earth. If you don’t believe those things, I can still like you, I just won’t hire you as a scientist.

CDT is not a style of testing. It’s not a toolbox of methods. It’s more fundamental than that. You could think of  CDT partly as an ethical position about testing. All methods or styles are available to Context-Driven people, but our selection of methods and reactions to testing situations are conditioned by our ethical position. This position is defined here. It’s also exemplified in the book Lessons Learned in Software Testing.

It’s a Way of Thinking AND a Community

CDT can be confusing for several reasons. One is that it has a dual nature. It’s a way of thinking as well as a community of people. Let me try to sort that out.

Anyone who thinks and works by the precepts of the Context-Driven School is a member of the school, whether or not they know that or acknowledge it. And if they think and work by principles that are similar, then they are a member of some other similar school that may or may not have a name. And if they think and work by principles that are hostile to CDT, then they are a member of some other school of thought, entirely. A “school of thought” is a pattern of thinking that at least one person engages in.

If you don’t know what you think about testing– if you have no beliefs, habits, understanding, etc.– then I guess you are not part of any school of thought. Otherwise, you are. Don’t whinge about it.

HOWEVER, what if you aren’t a “joiner” and you don’t want to be seen as “belonging” to any particular testing community. There are a lot of testers like that. Okay then, you can say that you’re not a member of any school of testing. You can even say that the whole idea of schools bothers you. If that’s your feeling, then I bet what’s happening is that you are reacting to CDT as a community, rather than as a worldview. But in the end, unless you just have no ideas and beliefs at all, you don’t have the option of living without a way of thinking. You only have the option of not describing and labeling that way of thinking, or not associating with people who think of testing in the same way as you do.

Why Have “Schools of Testing?”

It saves a lot of time and energy to acknowledge that there are basic differences and controversies in the craft of testing. We can acknowledge that and move on.

Here’s an example: A particular woman wrote a book with the word “testing” in the title. But her work does not bear upon my work. She uses assumptions and definition of words that I reject. In a very real and practical sense, I don’t actually consider her to be a tester, although she would say that she is. Given that, I don’t bother to attack her ideas. I don’t bother to find common ground. There is no interesting common ground between dissimilar paradigms of testing. I imagine she feels the same way toward me.

She has a perfect right to publish and speak at testing conferences. But I’m going to ignore her, pretty much. My shorthand for that is to say that she belongs to a different school of testing. I might characterize her school in general terms, sure. I might say she’s from the Agile School or the Factory School or the Quality Control School (in fact there are three different women I’m thinking of, each of whom has written a book with testing in the title, whom I would describe that way). That’s about all I’m going to do.

I save my energy by working within my school to deepen the testing craft as I see it. I comment on other schools rarely, and when I do the motivation is usually to prevent my readers and clients from thinking that there is only one school of testing thought. This is not the same thing as saying that all of us inside a school have to agree. In fact, one of the basic values of CDT is that we argue with each other. We challenge each other. We do have difference styles of testing and different opinions about practices.

A second reason I like the schools concept is that it helps me quickly establish my reputation with someone new. “I’m a context-driven tester. Go and Google that.”

The Basic Idea of Context Driven Testing

Here is the basic idea: Because testing (and any engineering activity) is a solution to a very difficult problem, it must be tailored to the context of the project, and therefore testing is a human activity that requires a great deal of skill to do well. That’s why we must study it seriously. We must practice our craft. Context-driven testers strive to become the Jedi knights of testing.

Aside from the idea, this is also a community. It is a world-wide movement. The most prominent leaders within the CDT school include: Cem Kaner, James Bach, Jon Bach, Michael Bolton, Doug Hoffman, Paul Holland, Matt Heusser, Mike Kelly, Rob Sabourin, Ben Simo, Henrik Andersson, Ajay Balamurugadas, Shrini Kulkarni, Pradeep Soundararajan, Bernie Berger, Selena Delesie, Sajjadul Hakim, Julian Harty, Karen Johnson, Jonathan Kohl, Tobbe Ryber, Meeta Prakash, S. Dhanasekar, and Jerry Weinberg. I may have left a few people out. This list is off the top of my head.

(At the time we declared ourselves, Jerry Weinberg told me he’s not a member of the school. Except that, philosophically, I think he really is.  Just by being himself and doing his own thing, Jerry’s work has been a beacon for the context-driven crowd. I consider what I do to be an ongoing reference to the life work of two people: Jerry Weinberg and the late Herbert Simon. I try to honor them by being a good tester.)

It’s not a Priesthood

Context-Driven Testing is an open community in the sense that anyone can speak up and contribute. The way you become leader in our circle is by having ideas, offering them publicly, and engaging in debate about them. Then, as your ideas are tested, you earn your reputation. I just met a fellow named Vernon Richards, for instance. He spoke up during the Nottingham Testers Gathering, and I was impressed with his questions, comments, and general attitude. He spoke with warmth and conviction. See? I didn’t even know who he was, and now I’m talking about him. That’s what I mean by reputation. It’s a start. I’d like to see him share more of his experiences at conferences.

The CAST 2011 Conference is All About Context-Driven Testing

If you look carefully at the innovations in testing practice and thought, I bet you’ll notice that most of them are coming from the Context-Driven community. And the CAST 2011 conference is the first conference devoted to the ideas. My next post will be about that.

This is What We Do

In the Context-Driven Testing community, the testing craft is a living, growing thing. This dialog, led by my partner in Rapid Testing, Michael Bolton, is a prime example of the life among us. Read the PDF that Michael refers to, and what will you see? You see many ideas proposed and discarded. You see definitions being made, and remade. You see people struggling to make sense of subtle, yet important distinctions.

In my world, the development of testing skill goes hand-in-hand with the development of our rhetoric of describing testing. The development of personal skill is linked to the development of social skill. This is why we smirk and roll our eyes when people come to us looking for templates and other pre-fabricated answers to what they believe are simple questions. My reaction to many who come to me is “You don’t need to learn the definition of term ‘test case’. You don’t need me to tell you ‘how to create a test plan’. What you need is to learn how to test. You need to struggle with imponderables; sit with them; turn them over in your mind. You need practice, and you need to talk through your practice with other testers.”
Michael’s dialog reminds me of the book Proofs and Refutations, by Imre Lakatos, which studies the exploratory and dialectical nature of mathematics by also using dialog.