No KPIs: Use Discussion

My son is ready to send the manuscript of his novel to publishers. It’s time to see what the interest is. In other words, we are going to beta on it. He made this decision tonight.

What is the quality level of his manuscript? There is no objective measure for that. Even if we might imagine “requirements” we could not say for sure if they are met. I can tell you that the novel is about 800 pages long, representing well more than 1,200 hours of his work alone. I have worked a lot on editing and review. The first half has been rewritten many times– maybe 20 or 30. It’s a mature draft.

The first third is good, in my opinion. I’m biased. I’ve read the parts I’ve read many many times. But it seems good to me. I cannot yet speak about the latter 2/3 because I haven’t gotten there yet. I know it will be good by the time we’ve completed the editing, because he’s using a methodical, competent editing process.

Here’s my point. My son, who relies on me to test his novel, has not asked me to quantify my process nor my results. I have not been asked for a KPI. He cares deeply about the quality of his work, but he doesn’t think that can be reduced to numbers. I think this is partly because my son is no longer a child. He doesn’t need me or anyone else to make complicated life simple for him.

How do you measure quality?

Gather relevant evidence through testing and other means. Then discuss that evidence.

That’s how it works for us. That’s how it works for publishers. That’s how it works for almost everything.

Who can’t accept this?

Children and liars.

But my company demands that I report quality in the form of an objective metric!

I’m sorry that you work for children and/or liars. You must feel awful.

 

Agile Testing Heuristic: The Power of Looking

Today I broke my fast with a testing exercise from a colleague. (Note: I better not tell you what it is or even who gave it to me, because after you read this it will be spoiled for you, whereas if you read this and at a later time stumble into that challenge, not knowing that’s the one I was talking about, it won’t be spoiled.)

The exercise involved a short spec and an EXE. The challenge was how to test it.

The first thing I checked is if it had a text interface that I could interact with programmatically. It did. So I wrote a program to flood it with “positive” and “negative” input. The results were collected in a log file. I programmatically checked the output and it was correct.

So far this is a perfectly ordinary Agile testing situation. It is consistent with any API testing or systematic domain testing of units you have heard of. The program I wrote performs a check, and the check is produced by my testing thought process and its output analyzed by a similar thought process. That human element qualifies this as testing and not merely naked checking. If I were to hand my automated check to someone else who did not think like a tester, it would not be testing anymore, although the checks would still have some value, probably.

Here’s my public service announcement: Kids! Remember to look at what is happening.

The Power of Looking

One aspect of my strategy I haven’t described yet is that I carefully watched the check as it was running. I do this not as a bored, offhanded, or incidental matter. It’s absolutely vital. I must observe all the output I can observe, rather than just the “pass/fail” status of my checks. I will comb through log files, watch the results in real-time, try things through the GUI, whatever CAN be seen, I want to see it.

As I watched the output flow by in this particular example, I noticed that it was much slower than I expected. Moreover, the speed of the output was variable. It seemed to vary semi-randomly. Since there was nothing in the nature of the program (as I understood it) that would explain slowness or variable timing, this became an instant focus of investigation. Either there’s a bug here or something I need to learn. (Note: that is known as the Explainability Oracle Heuristic.)

It’s possible that I could have anticipated and explicitly checked for performance issues, of course, but my point is that the Power of Looking is a heuristic for discovering lots of things you did NOT anticipate. The models in your mind generate expectations, automatically, that you may not even be aware of until they are violated.

This is important for all testing, but it’s especially important for tool-happy Agile testers, bless their hearts, some of whom consider automation to be next to godliness… Come to think of it, if God has automated his tests for human qualities, that would explain a lot…

 

 

Test Jumpers: One Vision of Agile Testing

Many software companies, these days, are organized around a number of small Agile teams. These teams may be working on different projects or parts of the same project. I have often toured such companies with their large open plan offices; their big tables and whiteboards festooned with colorful Post-Its occasionally fluttering to the floor like leaves in a perpetual autumn display; their too many earbuds and not nearly enough conference rooms. Sound familiar, Spotify? Skype?

(This is a picture of a smoke jumper. I wish test jumpers looked this cool.)

I have a proposal for skilled Agile testing in such places: a role called a “test jumper.” The name comes from the elite “smoke jumper” type of firefighter. A test jumper is a trained and enthusiastic test lead (see my Responsible Tester post for a description of a test lead) who “jumps” into projects and from project to project: evaluating the testing, doing testing or organizing people in other roles to do testing. A test jumper can function as test team of one (what I call an omega tester ) or join a team of other testers.

The value of a role like this arises because in a typical dedicated Agile situation, everyone is expected to help with testing, and yet having staff dedicated solely to testing may be unwarranted. In practice, that means everyone remains chronically an amateur tester, untrained and unmotivated. The test jumper role could be a role held by one person, dedicated to the mastery of testing skills and tools, who is shared among many projects. This is a role that I feel close to, because it’s sort of what I already do. I am a consulting software tester who likes to get his hands dirty doing testing and running in-house testing events. I love short-term assignments and helping other testers come up to speed.

 

 

What Does a Test Jumper Do?

A test jumper basically asks, How are my projects handling the testing? How can I contribute to a project? How can I help someone test today?

Specifically a test jumper:

  • may spend weeks on one project, acting as an ordinary responsible tester.
  • may spend a few days on one project, organizing and leading testing events, coaching people, and helping to evaluate the results.
  • may spend as little as 90 minutes on one project, reviewing a test strategy and giving suggestions to a local tester or developer.
  • may attend a sprint planning meeting to assure that testing issues are discussed.
  • may design, write, or configure a tool to help perform a certain special kind of testing.
  • may coach another tester about how to create a test strategy, use a tool, or otherwise learn to be a better tester.
  • may make sense of test coverage.
  • may work with designers to foster better testability in the product.
  • may help improve relations between testers and developers, or if there are no other testers help the developers think productively about testing.

Test jumping is a time-critical role. You must learn to triage and split your time across many task threads. You must reassess project and product risk pretty much every day. I can see calling someone a test jumper who never “jumps” out of the project, but nevertheless embodies the skills and temperament needs to work in a very flexible, agile, self-managed fashion, on an intense project.

Addendum #1: Commenter Augusto Evangelisti suggests that I emphasize the point about coaching. It is already in my list, above, but I agree it deserves more prominence. In order to safely “jump” away from a project, the test jumper must constantly lean toward nudging, coaching, or even training local helpers (who are often the developers themselves, and who are not testing specialists, even though they are super-smart and experienced in other technical realms) and local responsible testers (if there are any on that project). The ideal goal is for each team to be reasonably self-sufficient, or at least for the periodic visits of the test jumper to be enough to keep them on a good track.

What Does a Test Jumper Need?

  • The ability and the enthusiasm for plunging in and doing testing right now when necessary.
  • The ability to pull himself out of a specific test task and see the big picture.
  • The ability to recruit helpers.
  • The ability to coach and train testers, and people who can help testing.
  • A wide knowledge of tools and ability to write tools as needed.
  • A good respectful relationship with developers.
  • The ability to speak up in sprint planning meetings about testing-related issues such as testability.
  • A keen understanding of testability.
  • The ability to lead ad hoc groups of people with challenging personalities during occasional test events.
  • An ability to speak in front of people and produce useful and concise documentation as necessary.
  • The ability to manage many threads of work at once.
  • The ability to evaluate and explain testing in general, as well as with respect to particular forms of testing.

A good test jumper will listen to advice from anyone, but no one needs to tell a test jumper what to do next. Test jumpers manage their own testing missions, in consultation with such clients as arise. A test jumper must be able to discover and analyze the testing context, then adapt to it or shape it as necessary. It is a role made for the Context-Driven school of testing.

Does a Test Jumper Need to be a Programmer?

Coding skills help tremendously in this role, but being a good programmer is not absolutely required. What is required is that you learn technical things very quickly and have excellent problem-solving and social skills. Oh, and you ought to live and breathe testing, of course.

How Does a Test Jumper Come to Be?

A test jumper is mostly self-created, much as good developers are. A test jumper can start as a programmer, as I did, and then fall in love with the excitement of testing (I love the hunt for bugs). A test jumper may start as a tester, learn consulting and leadership skills, but not want to be a full-time manager. Management has its consolations and triumphs, of course, but some of us like to do technical things. Test jumping may be part of extending the career path for an experienced and valuable tester.

RST Methodology: “Responsible Tester”

In Rapid Software Testing methodology, we recognize three main roles: Leader, Responsible Tester, and Helper. These roles are situational distinctions. The same person might be a helper in one situation, a leader in another, and a responsible tester in yet another.

Responsible Tester

Rapid Software Testing is a human-centered approach to testing, because testing is a performance and can only be done by humans. Therefore, testing must be traceable to people, or else it is literally and figuratively irresponsible. Hence, a responsible tester is that tester who bears personal responsibility for testing a particular thing in a particular way for a particular project. The responsible tester answers for the quality of that testing, which means the tester can explain and defend the testing, and make it better if needed. Responsible testers also solicit and supervise helpers, as needed (see below).

This contrasts with factory-style testing, which relies on tools and texts rather than people. In the Factory school of testing thought, it should not matter who does the work, since people are interchangeable. Responsibility is not a mantle on anyone’s shoulders in that world, but rather a sort of smog that one seeks to avoid breathing too much of.

Example of testing without a responsible tester: Person A writes a text called a “test case” and hands it to person B. Person B reads the text and performs the instructions in the text. This may sound okay, but what if Person B is not qualified to evaluate if he has understood and performed the test, while at the same time Person A, the designer, is not watching and so also isn’t in position to evaluate it? In such a case, it’s like a driverless car. No one is taking responsibility. No one can say if the testing is good or take action if it is not good. If a problem is revealed later, they may both rightly blame the other.

That situation is a “sin” in Rapid Testing. To be practicing RST, there must always a responsible tester for any work that the project relies upon. (Of course students and otherwise non-professional testers can work unsupervised as practice or in the hopes of finding one more bug. That’s not testing the project relies upon.)

A responsible tester is like being the driver of an automobile or the pilot-in-command of an aircraft.

Helper

A helper is someone who contributes to the testing without taking responsibility for the quality of the work AS testing. In other words, if a responsible tester asks someone to do something simple to press a button, the helper may press the button without worrying about whether that has actually helped fulfill the mission of testing. Helpers should not be confused with inexperienced or low-skilled people. Helpers may be very skilled or have little skill. A senior architect who comes in to do testing might be asked to test part of the product and find interesting bugs without being expected to explain or defend his strategy for doing that. It’s the responsible tester whose job it is to supervise people who offer help and evaluate the degree to which their work is acceptable.

Beta testing is testing that is done entirely by helpers. Without responsible testers in the mix, it is not possible to evaluate in any depth what was achieved. One good way to use beta testers is to have them organized and engaged by one or more responsible testers.

Leader

A leader is someone whose responsibility is to foster and maintain the project conditions that make good testing possible; and to train, support, and evaluate responsible testers. There are at least two kinds of leader, a test lead and a test manager. The test manager is a test lead with the additional responsibilities of hiring, firing, performance reviews, and possibly budgeting.

In any situation where a leader is responsible for testing and yet has no responsible testers on his team, the leader IS the acting responsible tester. A leader surrounded by helpers is the responsible tester for that team.

 

Integrity #3: A Testimonial

Oliver Erlewein is an automation specialist. He’s respected in the Context-Driven Testing community of New Zealand and has been an agitator pushing back against the ISTQB. After some years of frustration with bad management he finally went independent. Now he’s back to full-time work. He posted the following as a comment:

Starting 2014, I have given up my self-employment and joined a (sort of) start up. I didn’t think I was ever going back to being employed but this was worth it. I have found a company that respects my professionalism and listens to what I say, where I am responsible for what I produce and get the full control of how to go about it. I and the task I do are respected. The word integrity doesn’t get used here but it is a place that actually has oodles of it.

Every now and again I hear the sentence “you are the expert so what do you suggest we do?” or “do what you think is right, you are the expert” ….and they mean it exactly like that. It makes for a completely different working environment. It motivates, it invigorates and it makes working fun. It puts heaps more pressure and responsibility on me but I am happy as taking that on board because I am convinced that I can do it (even if I still don’t know how right at this moment).

Although this shop is not agile (but more agile than a lot of the shops out there that call themselves agile!) they do something that is one of the main success factors for agile: They re-introduce back the idea of responsibility, professionalism and craftsmanship into (IT) work. And that motivates. I feel like I can call bull**** if it is appropriate to do so or get traction on subjects I think are important.

So although it meant I made a career change away from my original trajectory I made it consciously towards a more ethical work life, where integrity and being the best you can actually counts for something.

Thank you for sharing that with us, Oliver. It goes to show that there are good managers out there who understand craftsmanship and leadership.

 

A Test is a Performance

Testing is a performance, not an artifact.

Artifacts may be produced before, during, or after the act of testing. Whatever they are, they are not tests. They may be test instructions, test results, or test tools. They cannot be tests.

Note: I am speaking a) authoritatively about how we use terms in Rapid Testing Methodology, b) non-authoritatively of my best knowledge of how testing is thought of more broadly within the Context-Driven school, and c) of my belief about how anyone, anywhere should think of testing if they want a clean and powerful way to talk about it.

I may informally say “I created a test.” What I mean by that is that I designed an experience, or I made a plan for a testing event. That plan itself is not the test, anymore than a picture of a car is a car. Therefore, strictly speaking, the only way to create a test is to perform a test. As Michael Bolton likes to say, there’s a world of difference between sheet music and a musical performance, even though we might commonly refer to either one as “music.” Consider these sentences: “The music at the symphony last night was amazing.” vs. “Oh no, I left the music on my desk at home.”

We don’t always have to speak strictly, but we should know how and know why we might want to.

Why can’t a test be an artifact?

Because artifacts don’t think or learn in the full human sense of that word, that’s why, and thinking is central to the test process. So to claim that an artifact is a test is like wearing a sock puppet on your hand and claiming that it’s a little creature talking to you. That would be no more than you talking to yourself, obviously, and if you removed yourself from that equation the puppet wouldn’t be a little creature, would it? It would be a decorated sock lying on the floor. The testing value of an artifact can be delivered only in concert with an appropriately skilled and motivated tester.

With procedures or code you can create a check. See here for a detailed look at the difference between checking and testing. Checking is part of testing, of course. Anyone who runs checks that fail knows that the next step is figuring out what the failures mean. A tester must also evaluate whether the checks are working properly and whether there are enough of them, or too many, or the wrong kind. All of that is part of the performance of testing.

When a “check engine” light goes on in your car, or any strange alert, you can’t know until you go to a mechanic whether that represents a big problem or a little problem. The check is not testing. The testing is more than the check itself.

But I’ve seen people follow test scripts and only do what the test document tells them to do!

Have you really witnessed that? I think the most you could possibly have witnessed is…

EITHER:

a tester who appeared to do “only” what the test document tells him, while constantly and perhaps unconsciously adjusting and reacting to what’s happening with the system under test. (Such a tester may find bugs, but does so by contributing interpretation, judgment, and analysis; by performing.)

OR:

a tester who necessarily missed a lot of bugs that he could have found, either because the test instructions were far too complex, or far too vague, or there was far too little of it (because that documentation is darn expensive) and the tester failed to perform as a tester to compensate.

In either case, the explicitly written or coded “test” artifact can only be an inanimate sock, or a sock puppet animated by the tester. You can choose to suffer without a tester, or to cover up the presence of the tester. Reality will assert itself either way.

What danger could there be in speaking informally about writing “tests?”

It’s not necessarily dangerous to speak informally. However, a possible danger is that non-testing managers and clients of our work will think of testers as “test case writers” instead of as people who perform the skilled process of testing. This may cause them to treat testers as fungible commodities producing “tests” that are comprised solely of explicit rules. Such a theory of testing– which is what we call the Factory school of testing thought– leads to expensive artifacts that uncover few bugs. Their value is mainly in that they look impressive to ignorant people.

If you are talking to people who fully understand that testing is a performance, it is fine to speak informally. Just be on your guard when you hear people say “Where are your tests?” “Have you written any tests?” or “Should you automate those tests?” (I would rather hear “How do you test this?” “Where are you focusing you testing?” or “Are you using tools to help your testing?”)

Thanks to Michael Bolton and Aleksander Simic for reviewing and improving this post.

 

Mr. Langella Never Does it the Same Way Twice

This is from the New York Times:

Its other hallmark is that Mr. Langella never does the part the same way twice. This is partly because he’s still in the process of discovering the character and partly because it’s almost a point of honor. “The Brit approach is very different from mine,” he said. “There’s a tendency to value consistency over creativity. You get it, you nail it, you repeat it. I’d rather hang myself. To me, every night within a certain framework — the framework of integrity — you must forget what you did the night before and create it anew every single time you walk out on the stage.”

I love that phrase the framework of integrity. It ties in to what I’ve been saying about integrity and also what is true about informal testing: if you are well prepared, and you are true to yourself, then whatever you do is going to be spontaneously and rather effortlessly okay, even if it changes over time.

I often hear anxiety in testers and managers about how terrible it is to do something once, some particular way, and then to forget it. What a waste, they say. Let’s write it all down and not deviate from our past behavior, they say. Well I don’t think it’s waste, I think it’s mental hygiene. Testing is a performance, and I want to be free to perform better. So, I make notes, sure. But I am properly reluctant about formalizing what I do.

Doing your best work includes having the courage to let go of pretty good work that you’ve done before.

Integrity 2: On Being Under the Radar [REVISED]

I have taken down the original text of this post at the request of my colleague who had the courage and audacity to let me post his detailed comment about how he works “under the radar” to change things in his company.

I had posted his comment originally with his permission, of course. But, apparently, in his country, “it’s illegal to harm [one’s] employer’s business” and it can reasonably be considered doing harm to express a low opinion of your own company’s behavior, even if you are dedicated to improving that behavior. Dirty laundry in public is arguably bad for business, if your business involves telling people that you’re a trustworthy expert, and your laundry says otherwise.

Of course this is understandable. Working under the radar generally means not being public about what you are doing. Therefore, as much as I prefer the clean feeling of working ON the radar, I wish him good luck with his mode of influencing a big, commercial, ceremonial system.